Exercise is well known as a strong generator of oxidative stress and associated inflammation in the body.  The accumulation of hydrogen peroxide, could serve as a robust bio-marker of oxidative stress and inflammation in the body.
In recent studies, the use of vanillin extracts, was shown to exhibit powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potential, via scavenging hydrogen peroxide, and reducing the production of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, the vanillin, showed therapeutic effect, in down-regulating cytokines (inflammatory triggers) in both test-tube and in-human test models.

shutterstock_267455108   Vanilla ranks very high on the ORAC tables (industry wide standard measure of antioxidant potential), in measuring its potential antioxidant capability.  Vanilla planifolia is the most common species of vanilla and is grown in India, Indonesia, Mexico, and Guatemala.  Pure vanilla is not ‘cheap’ – and as with many foods, manufacturers looking to reduce production costs have access to many vanilla imitations.  Surprisingly, these imitations have been extracted from by-products of the paper making industry, and coal-tar derivatives.

So grab some pure vanilla, and use it to sprinkle over your fruit, yogurt, or pop some in your coffee, hot chocolate…or just have it in an SFuels bar.

References:
1. Inflammation-responsive antioxidant nanoparticles based on a polymeric prodrug of vanillin. Kwon J,  et al. May 2013.
2.  Reduction of inflammatory responses and enhancement of extracellular matrix formation by vanillin-incorporated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) scaffolds.  Lee Y.  Oct 2012